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ELORA, FERGUS AND CENTRE WELLINGTON ~ DISCOVER YOUR PERFECT PLACE!


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Historic Walking Tours

Elora Cataract Trailway
Elora Gorge Conservation Area
Friends of the Grand
Highland Pines Campground
Historic Walking Tours
One Axe Pursuits Zipline
The Butter Tart Trail


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Take time to visit the past...

A.J. Casson Tour

During the summers of 1929 to 1931, A.J. Casson visited the Elora area and painted what would later be known as his Elora-Salem series. It was during these years that he learned to master the art of watercolour painting. See these pieces brought to life as you visit the scenes of his painting and discover exactly why Casson was “in love with Elora”.

Church Tours

The early gathering places of faith and religion in Fergus and Elora began, for the most part, as rough-hewn wooden structures scattered amidst the community. Learn about the trials and triumphs of these historic churches as they grew into the magnificent stone edifices of today.

Pierpoint/Glen Lamond Tour

Before Fergusson andWebster settled the area, Richard Pierpoint’s Black settlement had already been in existence further upstream for more than a decade. Later this became a home for expelled Scottish “squatters”, victims of the Highland clearances. Monkland Mills and many other old homes and sites here are now a historic testament to Fergus’ pioneers.

Historical Houses Tours

The evolution of homes in Fergus and Elora was deeply rooted in the social climate. The first dwellings were crude log houses but gradually these places were built of stone, some becoming grand manors displaying the wealth of the immigrant lowland Scots. It was a sharp contrast to the Highlanders’ shanties on the outskirts of the area. Explore the fascinating history of the communities through the homes of the first citizens.

River Vistas and Native Sites Tours

From Elora’s deep limestone Gorge to Fergus’ steep banks, the Grand River provides a dramatic backdrop for the growing pains and struggles of the fledgling communities. The beauty of the Gorge’s formation, resulting in numerous caves, cliffs and curious rock shapes, attracted newcomers to the area and provided a home for the early Attawandaron Nation. Discover these mysterious places for yourself.

Early Landmarks and Settlements Tours

As was the case with many growing villages of that time, Elora and Fergus started out with their fair share of trials, from exploding breweries to wild pigs roaming the streets. The buildings that mark these times are just as interesting. Explore a temperance hall, the “kissing stone”, drill sheds, and many other fascinating sites.

Public and Commercial Buildings Tours

Adam Fergusson and JamesWebster hoped that their tiny settlement, named Fergus in 1833, would soon become a beacon of Scottish culture and industry in the Canadian wilderness. Neither Fergusson norWebster was on hand to witness the emergence of the beautiful limestone structures that now dominate the Fergus streetscape. The history of the settlement and growth of nearby Elora is also extraordinary. The visual beauty, hidden secrets and music of its falls and gorge attracted and inspired many newcomers. Creative artists, photographers, musicians, builders, architects and writers chronicled its emergence from a backwoods settlement to a natural and cultural destination in the province.

 

Historic Walking Tours

519 846 6685

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Your online guide to explore the attractions, accommodations, restaurants, festivals and local food producers of Elora, Fergus, Guelph and Wellington County, Ontario, Canada.

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